The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: FOREVERHAUS by Kaley Tedesco


spiral at the heart of the haus

the shower whispers says bloody mary—
her name or mine or a knock when no one is at the door

neighbors dare each other to ring the bell broken for years
noiselessness existing against the fear of the haus.

i dry off make the faucet water a discarded shift
no longer of any use to me. some say the haus grows from within,

a pie is lazing on the sill daydreaming of its fruit bursting
gems against the heat of the oven.

now it bleeds from the crust & i, too, bleed something
that is not blood according to your legend. my toy bears

jolt across the room my old dolls cry at the gables their spouses off in some war.
bloody mary tries to find me in the walls.

when you die she says i’ll keep your parts inside the haus forever
the parts that i inherit a pendant

two jadeite bowls black magic roses casketed in gold
all the rings of your life & the fingers that filled them.

perhaps i’m planted sooner than is natural. my tulips bud
on a warm day in winter die out within the hour fertilize the dirt

with their deadness. a doppelgänger blossom or just another resurrection.
i’m in here i call to her from within a wall that does not exist

in her memory of the haus. she will never find me.

This selection comes from FOREVERHAUS, available from White Stag. Purchase your copy here! Our curator for this selection is Kimberly Ann Priest.

Kailey Tedesco is the author of She Used to be on a Milk Carton (April Gloaming Publishing) and Lizzie, Speak (winner of White Stag Publishing’s 2018 MS Contest). Her newest collection, FOREVERHAUS, is now available from White Stag. She is a senior editor for Luna Luna Magazine, and she teaches literature and writing at Moravian College and Northampton Community College. You can find her work in Electric Literature,The Journal, Ninth Letter, Fairy Tale Review, Black Warrior Review, and more. For further information, please visit kaileytedesco.com.

Kimberly Ann Priest is the author of Slaughter the One Bird (Sundress 2021), Parrot Flower (Glass 2021), Still Life (PANK 2020), and White Goat Black Sheep (Finishing Line Press 2018). Winner of the New American Press 2019 Heartland Poetry Prize, her work has appeared or is forthcoming in journals such as North Dakota Quarterly, Salamander, Slipstream, The Berkeley Poetry Review, Borderland and many others. She is an associate poetry editor for the Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry and Embody reader for The Maine Review. Find her work at kimberlyannpriest.com.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: FOREVERHAUS by Kaley Tedesco


mother moonlights as bloody mary

she split body & spirit


one in the raspberry bramble with her motherbody

the other stuck in my windowpane painted white

i am not allowed the chocolate i stole


& so i’m sent to the hall mirror’s singsong, sheetbody, & wallgleam

my eyes become invisible thistles underneath

& the motherparts make me overly precautious

i stretch on the bear rug kissing

its snout la belle et le bete

this whole time i think i have been digging

for hell just to prove it’s a place i haven’t already been

This selection comes from FOREVERHAUS, available from White Stag. Purchase your copy here! Our curator for this selection is Kimberly Ann Priest.

Kailey Tedesco is the author of She Used to be on a Milk Carton (April Gloaming Publishing) and Lizzie, Speak (winner of White Stag Publishing’s 2018 MS Contest). Her newest collection, FOREVERHAUS, is now available from White Stag. She is a senior editor for Luna Luna Magazine, and she teaches literature and writing at Moravian College and Northampton Community College. You can find her work in Electric Literature,The Journal, Ninth Letter, Fairy Tale Review, Black Warrior Review, and more. For further information, please visit kaileytedesco.com.

Kimberly Ann Priest is the author of Slaughter the One Bird (Sundress 2021), Parrot Flower (Glass 2021), Still Life (PANK 2020), and White Goat Black Sheep (Finishing Line Press 2018). Winner of the New American Press 2019 Heartland Poetry Prize, her work has appeared or is forthcoming in journals such as North Dakota Quarterly, Salamander, Slipstream, The Berkeley Poetry Review, Borderland and many others. She is an associate poetry editor for the Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry and Embody reader for The Maine Review. Find her work at kimberlyannpriest.com.

Doubleback Books Announces the Release of Wendy Carlisle’s Discount Fireworks

Doubleback Books announces the release of Wendy Carlisle’s Discount Fireworks. Originally published in 2008 by Jacaranda Press, Discount Fireworks is grounded in the specific and personal, showing the universal truth of emotion that extends beyond the speaker and the situation of the poem.

Wendy Carlisle’s poems explore the minutiae of contemporary life, from a childhood in the 1950s to Hurricane Katrina and the thinning glaciers of the twenty-first century. Haunted by the Ozarks of her native Arkansas, the poet explores topics ranging from vampires to Adam and Eve to life in the Andromeda Galaxy. Carlisle’s poems range from sonnets to syllabics to free verse, taking us through an Arkansas landscape touched by wind and water, patois and the rocky Ozark soil. Discount Fireworks is a hymn to landscape and personal identity, a reminder of the interconnectedness of daily existence. Haunting and beautiful, Carlisle’s poems will transport you into an otherworldly plane grounded in everyday joys.

Download your copy of Discount Fireworks on the Doubleback Books website: https://doublebackbooks.wordpress.com/discount-fireworks-by-wendy-t-carlisle/

Wendy Taylor Carlisle lives and writes in the Arkansas Ozarks. She is the author of four books, Reading Berryman to the Dog, Discount Fireworks, The Mercy of Traffic, and On the Way to the Promised Land Zoo, and five chapbooks. See her work online and in print in Persimmon Tree, pacificREVIEW, 2RiverView, Mom Egg, San Pedro River Review, Atlanta Review, and others. She has an MFA from Vermont College of Fine Arts, has been anthologized, and has 12 times been nominated for the Pushcart Prize. For more information, her website is www.wendytaylorcarlisle.com.

Sundress Publications Editorial Internship Open Call

Sundress Publications is an entirely volunteer-run 501(c)(3) nonprofit publishing collective founded in 2000 that hosts a variety of online journals and publishes chapbooks, full-length collections, and literary anthologies in both print and digital formats. Sundress also publishes the annual Best of the Net Anthology, celebrating the best work published online, runs Poets in Pajamas, an online reading series, and the Gone Dark Archives, preserving online journals that have reached the end of their run.

This editorial internship position will run from July 1, 2021 to January 1, 2022. The editorial intern’s responsibilities can include writing press releases, composing blog posts and promotional emails, proofreading manuscripts, assembling press kits, collating editorial data, research, managing spreadsheets, and more. The intern may also be responsible for writing copy, conducting interviews with Sundress authors, reviewing newly released books, and promoting our catalog of titles.

Preferred qualifications include:

  • A keen eye for proofreading
  • Strong written communication skills
  • Familiarity with WordPress, Microsoft Word, and Google Suite
  • Ability to work under a deadline and multitask
  • Knowledge of and interest in contemporary literature a plus

This is a REMOTE internship with the team communicating primarily via email and text messages and is therefore not restricted to applicants living in any particular geographic area. Interns are asked to devote 10 hours per week to their assignments.

While this is an unpaid internship, all interns will gain real-world experience of the ins and outs of independent publishing with a nationally recognized press while creating a portfolio of work for future employment opportunities. Interns will also be able to attend all workshops at the Sundress Academy for the Arts at cost.

We welcome, encourage, and are enthusiastic to see a diverse array of applicants in all areas, including race, ethnicity, disability, gender, class, religion, education, immigration status, and more.

To apply, please send a resume and a brief cover letter detailing your interest in the position to Staff Director Kanika Lawton at sundressstaffdirector@gmail.com by May 20, 2021.

A detailed application and interview guide can be found here.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: FOREVERHAUS by Kaley Tedesco


mother

under your cheek it’s all blood & i see it. by the lake so dry, you cart me
through the forest in nursery rhyme. tonight i am either precious


zirconia or go far from here else find my heart-pieces, boxed.
childhood friend of mine, i take you to the haus full of golden


junk we love with every carotid artery in our one-day bodies.
you’re-not-my-real-mom beats me upside the matted curls with a tooth-comb.


for the umpteenth time, fear not— mayday is soon & the dancers
will surely spike my cranium with ribbon. now my very heartbeat is the name


bloody mary & my very corneal tear is a mirror with glass shatter to the hundredth
decimal point. the wrong time portal has me sutured to its underbelly.


this is not the natal chart i came with. just once i’d like to live in a future
corpse, rotted to a pile of improperly laundered delicates. that’s right—


i’m made of lace & that night you storied me about ghosts so hard,
they black-magicked my retinal cavities. bow down bones of you.


i am an afterlife for at least one small thing. unmothering as an attempt
at good works is what you should call it when you speculum your mouth


& all kinds of new genus roses fall out.

This selection comes from FOREVERHAUS, available from White Stag. Purchase your copy here! Our curator for this selection is Kimberly Ann Priest.

Kailey Tedesco is the author of She Used to be on a Milk Carton (April Gloaming Publishing) and Lizzie, Speak (winner of White Stag Publishing’s 2018 MS Contest). Her newest collection, FOREVERHAUS, is now available from White Stag. She is a senior editor for Luna Luna Magazine, and she teaches literature and writing at Moravian College and Northampton Community College. You can find her work in Electric Literature,The Journal, Ninth Letter, Fairy Tale Review, Black Warrior Review, and more. For further information, please visit kaileytedesco.com.

Kimberly Ann Priest is the author of Slaughter the One Bird (Sundress 2021), Parrot Flower (Glass 2021), Still Life (PANK 2020), and White Goat Black Sheep (Finishing Line Press 2018). Winner of the New American Press 2019 Heartland Poetry Prize, her work has appeared or is forthcoming in journals such as North Dakota Quarterly, Salamander, Slipstream, The Berkeley Poetry Review, Borderland and many others. She is an associate poetry editor for the Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry and Embody reader for The Maine Review. Find her work at kimberlyannpriest.com.

Now Accepting Residency Applications for Fall 2021

The Sundress Academy for the Arts (SAFTA) is now accepting applications for short-term writing residencies in all genres—poetry, fiction, nonfiction, playwriting, screenwriting, journalism, academic writing, and more—for their fall residency period which runs from August 23, 2021 to January 2, 2022. These residencies are designed to give artists time and space to complete their creative projects in a quiet and productive environment. 

Each farmhouse residency costs $300/week, which includes a room of one’s own, as well as access to our communal kitchen, bathroom, office, and living space, plus wireless internet.

Residencies in the Writers Coop are $150/week and include your own private dry cabin as well as access to the farmhouse amenities. Because of the low cost, we are rarely able to offer scholarships for Writers Coop residents.

Residents will stay at the SAFTA farmhouse, located on a working farm on a 45-acre wooded plot in a Tennessee “holler” perfect for hiking, camping, and nature walks. The farmhouse is also just a half-hour from downtown Knoxville, an exciting and creative city that is home to a thriving artistic community. SAFTA is ideal for writers looking for a rural retreat with urban amenities. 

SAFTA’s residencies, which also include free access to workshops, readings, and events, offer a unique and engaging experience. Residents can participate in local writing workshops, lead their own workshops, and even have the opportunity to learn life skills like gardening and animal care.

As part of our commitment to anti-racist work, we are now also using a reparations payment model for our farmhouse residencies which consists of the following:

  1. 3 reparations weeks of equally divided payments for Black and/or Indigenous identifying writers at $150/week
  2. 3 discounted weeks of equally divided payments for BIPOC writers at $250/week
  3. 6 equitable weeks of equally divided payments at $300/week

Black and/or Indigenous identifying writers are also invited to apply for a $350 support grant to help cover the costs of food, travel, childcare, and/or any other needs while they are at the residency. We are currently able to offer two of these grants per residency period (spring/summer/fall). If you would like to donate to expand this funding, you may do so here.

For the 2021 fall residency period, SAFTA will be offering the following fellowships only: 

  • VIDA Fellowship for Women & Nonbinary Writers: one full and one 50% fellowship for women and nonbinary identifying writers sponsored by VIDA
  • Black & Indigenous Writers Fellowships: one full fellowship for Black and/or Indigenous identifying writers
Portrait of Tatiana looking at the camera with greenery. Taken by Mel Taing

Our judge this year’s VIDA fellowship is writer, artist, and educator Tatiana Johnson-Boria (she/her/hers). Her writing explores identity, trauma, especially inherited trauma, and what it means to heal. She completed her MFA in Creative Writing at Emerson College and is a 2021 Tin House Scholar. She’s received honorable mention for the 2020 Academy of American Poets Prize, is a 2020 Best of the Net Finalist, and a 2017 Pushcart Prize nominee. Find her work in or forthcoming at Ploughshares, New Delta Review, Foundry and others.

Please note in your application if you are applying for one of these fellowships. 

The application deadline for the fall residency period is May 15, 2021. Find out more about the application process at www.sundressacademyforthearts.com.

The application fee is waived for all BIPOC identifying writers. For all fellowship applications, the application fee will also be waived for those who demonstrate financial need; please state this in your application under the financial need section. Limited partial scholarships are also available to any applicant with financial need. 

Sundress Reads: Review of Genealogy Lesson for the Laity

In her debut collection, Genealogy Lesson for the Laity (Unsolicited Press, 2020), Cathryn Shea traces her ancestry from the Portuguese islands of the Azores to the shores of Provincetown and Providence to the landscape of Northern California, where four generations of her family have put down roots. Lineage forms the narrative thread of these dreamlike poems, chronicling Shea’s memories of her parents and grandparents as well as her own evolving role as a mother and grandmother. Through communion with the past, Shea examines how the legacy of her genealogy manifests throughout her daily life, guiding her interactions with relatives, friends, lovers and everyday existence. For all those who have searched for answers in their family history, her poems blur the boundaries between decades, recording the passing of traditions from one generation to the next. 

Shea’s vivid language captures the role of precious objects in the canon of family history, transmitting memories down the matrilineal line. In “Star Death,” she describes her great-aunt’s “legendary / five-carat, cushion-cut rock / set in Art Deco platinum, said to be / from her heavenly spouse.” In “Great-Great-Grandmother’s Green Skirts,” she recalls “The green-gowned girl bound for California, / teal feathers sewn to her collar, / irises iridescent as prisms.” These family treasures are the physical relics of forgotten memories, prisms that capture the hopes and dreams of Shea’s ancestors. The vibrant, living language of these poems is grounded both in her lineage and the sense of renewal found in the natural world. In the title poem, the speaker recounts “The genome of my aunt is in the family… I buried my key to her house / in the skirts of the weeping willow. / Spring nailed its velvet wrist / to my outstretched arm.”

Elsewhere, Shea draws on the more conceptual tradition of naming to explore the duplicity of her grandfather’s government-assigned surname, which both erases his ancestral identity and links her family to the thousands of other immigrants from the Azores who settled in America. In “Enos is Not the Real Family Name,” Shea is walking in Provincetown when she notices the Portuguese name “Enos” written on local mailboxes, leading her to recall her grandfather’s anger at the erasure of his family’s original name—Oliveira—at Ellis Island: “My grandfather blamed the government / for indifference to immigrants, / their family origins and traditions. / The customs officers assigned Enos / to multitudes of Azores Portuguese.” Despite a loss of individual identity, their shared name leads Shea to feel a sense of solidarity with the strangers in Provincetown’s Portuguese community. By comparing the forgotten histories of her ancestors with the shared experience and stories of other Portuguese immigrants, she reflects “I must steal from other stories, other Enos histories / and merge the made-up with the supposed facts, / which I can never know.”

Many of these poems take place in the liminal space of hospitals, waiting for a dreaded diagnosis. In “Editing What the Doctors Keep Saying,” Shea reflects on the failure of language to address the uncertainty of illness: “Will we both be gone when the mutations are known?… / the trials, the cures, medical glossaries swirling over my head, / language I don’t understand, no relief in the cryptic words of the prognosis.” This play on words refers to both the editing of genes, the genetic mutations that result in health problems, and how the selective editing of words can help us cope with the truth. Similarly, Shea examines the role that genetics and matrilineal lineage plays in our perception of disease in “The Short Straw”: “When my best friend drew the straw / of ovarian cancer she blamed herself / for taking hormone replacements, / blamed her mother’s genes.” The discovery that no genetic mutation is to blame results in a meditation on the randomness of the universe, a prescient moment of clarity that resists any sentimental attempts to instill a false sense of meaning in her friend’s suffering. Other poems examine the connection between womanhood and the cycle of life, such as a tender, striking poem about generational attitudes toward breastfeeding that spans five generations, from Shea’s grandmother to the poet’s young grandson.

Shea’s exploration of genealogy extends to the natural landscape of California, where the lush and vivid setting forms her impressions of family history. A resident of Fairfax, Shea is a fourth-generation Northern Californian, which manifests in an abiding love for the Golden State. Her poems leap between vivid locations, from deserts to canyons and waterfalls. In “Oakland,” Shea chronicles the unique role the city plays a catalyst for major events in her past: “My father got stationed at Coast Guard Island, fell in love / with my mother at a dance in Oakland. / The earthquake wiped out my grandmother’s girlhood street / when the freeway collapsed in Oakland… There’s no there there—I was slow to realize / Gertrude Stein was talking about Oakland.” Shea later specifies the famous event she refers to: the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake, when a large portion of a multi-lane freeway known as the Cypress Street Viaduct collapsed. Deeply embedded in the local landscape and history, these poems are sparkling recollections of another place and time.

Throughout this bold and electrifying collection, Shea weaves an intricate web of history, ancestry and memory, the strands that make up an individual life. By transcending the limits of time to call upon the influence of her ancestors, she examines the way we are all intertwined. Genealogy Lesson for the Laity reminds us of the resonant significance of the ghosts of our past, a haunting meditation on the role family history plays in shaping every aspect of our lives.

Genealogy Lesson for the Laity is available at Unsolicited Press


Eliza Browning is a student at Wheaton College in Massachusetts, where she studies English and art history. Her work has previously appeared in Rust + Moth, Vagabond City Lit, Contrary Magazine, and Up the Staircase Quarterly, among others. She is a poetry editor for EX/POST Magazine and reads poetry for COUNTERCLOCK Journal.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: FOREVERHAUS by Kaley Tedesco


legend

the importance of the candyhaus is soft-sleep, voices spoken
in this ungentle rendering of my gingerbones. my birth took place


in new jersey, palace of fountain malls & ricotta tongues. i arrived
to that world pickled in the juice of my own past lives. my teenaged


mother kept her distance, found too much of me in her sleep. the first
night of air-breathing brought me no dreams, but talk with the dead


is ashore within me, my openings all shut up with salts. i was
fawn-bodied, now just a head, a cameo appearance carted off


into the pine barrens, no licorice for snacking, left wrapped
only in the scrying lake. this upbringing of caravans left me


at the altar of a folklore i’ll one day come to champion. mrs. leeds,
motherwitch, i am child thirteen, if you’ll have me in your shack


of sugar toys & smelling salts, shack of sundries & mortar-cobbler.
it takes a village—the majority rules to swath me in a pumpkin


carving. mischief night is lost to time, burned celluloid—theda bara,
vampirequeen, in my every waking thought, gone before i enter.


this starpower, beloved to me, never blamed my stopping
heart on the ghost of my past relatives, never knew my body


arrived to this world laced in the ectoplasm it left with & surely
none of me was left over for the breadcrumb following,


scrubbing the dirt road to find the sour ribboning of the witch
who bore me, still alive & crowned in pinecones. there was never


any devil in your cow’s milk—only me.

This selection comes from FOREVERHAUS, available from White Stag. Purchase your copy here! Our curator for this selection is Kimberly Ann Priest.

Kailey Tedesco is the author of She Used to be on a Milk Carton (April Gloaming Publishing) and Lizzie, Speak (winner of White Stag Publishing’s 2018 MS Contest). Her newest collection, FOREVERHAUS, is now available from White Stag. She is a senior editor for Luna Luna Magazine, and she teaches literature and writing at Moravian College and Northampton Community College. You can find her work in Electric Literature,The Journal, Ninth Letter, Fairy Tale Review, Black Warrior Review, and more. For further information, please visit kaileytedesco.com.

Kimberly Ann Priest is the author of Slaughter the One Bird (Sundress 2021), Parrot Flower (Glass 2021), Still Life (PANK 2020), and White Goat Black Sheep (Finishing Line Press 2018). Winner of the New American Press 2019 Heartland Poetry Prize, her work has appeared or is forthcoming in journals such as North Dakota Quarterly, Salamander, Slipstream, The Berkeley Poetry Review, Borderland and many others. She is an associate poetry editor for the Nimrod International Journal of Prose and Poetry and Embody reader for The Maine Review. Find her work at kimberlyannpriest.com.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Fog by Dakotah Jennifer


Verdant

A thin, bumpy sheet of ice covers the asphalt.
Grind my heels in and see the ice pebbles make sloped mountains.
I can see the small white footprint peaks behind me.
This is how I imagine myself
Walking along, leaving mountains in my path
Cracking ice and leaving marks where I have been
Making my way safely to the landing.


As I walk the ice slowly gets thinner
And finally disappears. Only the concrete is left.
This is how I imagine myself
Slowly thinning until only the bare minimum is left.


Sometimes ice is a good thing
The Earth’s rotation tilts and suddenly, the trees shed their shields,
A sky sends down bullets of frozen oceans,
A whole new coat of fur for every weather-defying creature.
The weak die and only the wise grow back.
This is how I imagine myself
Somehow too wise to stop but too weak to grow a thicker coat.
Not strong enough to resist the weather’s impulses
But somehow not capable of dying off.


All of life is white and cold and stifling.
Ice crackles and falls from the roof
Forming a melting lump on the frozen mulch.
The sun, heating the harsh surface of the all-too-fragile ice sheets.

This is how I always imagine myself.
All I want is one new day
Where birds sing
Nothing is stuck
There is no more cold
And everything is lush and full and not hungry anymore.
verdant.

This selection comes from Fog, available from Bloof Books. Purchase your copy here! Our curator for this selection is Shannon Wolf.

Dakotah Jennifer is a twenty-year-old black writer currently attending Washington University in St. Louis. She started writing poetry at eight and has loved it ever since. Jennifer has been published in Across the Margin, HerStry, Popsugar, The Pinch Journal, Protean Mag, Apartment Poetry, Paintbucket.page, The Grief Diaries, The Confessionalist Zine, Oral Rinse Zine, and Ripple Zine. She was accepted into the Juniper Writing Workshop at Amherst and the Writing Workshops Paris with Carve Magazine for the 2021 year. She won Washington University’s Harriet Schwenk Kluver award for the 2018-2019 year. Her first chapbook, Fog, is published with Bloof Books, and her second chapbook/zine, Safe Passage, was recently released with Radical Paper Press.

Shannon Wolf is a British writer and teacher, living in Louisiana. She is currently a joint MA-MFA candidate in Poetry at McNeese State University. She is the Non-Fiction Editor of The McNeese Review and Social Media Intern for Sundress Publications. She also holds an MA in Creative Writing from Lancaster University. Her poetry, short fiction, and non-fiction (which can also be found under the name Shannon Bushby) have appeared in The Forge and Great Weather for Media, among others. You can find her on social media @helloshanwolf.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Fog by Dakotah Jennifer


Fog

Fog rolls like dice sometimes.
Fog does not do the killing, but somehow, dead bodies show up
where fog has been.
Fog does not choke, but may suffocate.
Fog has no color,
But sometimes
From far away
Looks white.
Fog is the killer that doesn’t fit the gloves
Has no gloves.
Leaves its mark on everything.

She is fog
I am the bodies.
In every circumstance
I am the bodies.

This selection comes from Fog, available from Bloof Books. Purchase your copy here! Our curator for this selection is Shannon Wolf.

Dakotah Jennifer is a twenty-year-old black writer currently attending Washington University in St. Louis. She started writing poetry at eight and has loved it ever since. Jennifer has been published in Across the Margin, HerStry, Popsugar, The Pinch Journal, Protean Mag, Apartment Poetry, Paintbucket.page, The Grief Diaries, The Confessionalist Zine, Oral Rinse Zine, and Ripple Zine. She was accepted into the Juniper Writing Workshop at Amherst and the Writing Workshops Paris with Carve Magazine for the 2021 year. She won Washington University’s Harriet Schwenk Kluver award for the 2018-2019 year. Her first chapbook, Fog, is published with Bloof Books, and her second chapbook/zine, Safe Passage, was recently released with Radical Paper Press.

Shannon Wolf is a British writer and teacher, living in Louisiana. She is currently a joint MA-MFA candidate in Poetry at McNeese State University. She is the Non-Fiction Editor of The McNeese Review and Social Media Intern for Sundress Publications. She also holds an MA in Creative Writing from Lancaster University. Her poetry, short fiction, and non-fiction (which can also be found under the name Shannon Bushby) have appeared in The Forge and Great Weather for Media, among others. You can find her on social media @helloshanwolf.