The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Jeannine Hall Gailey’s “Unexplained Fevers”

JHGKitsuneHeadshot

I Like the Quiet: Snow White

The minutes’ silence wraps around me like a stole
and underneath this glass, I contemplate the perfect
vanilla ice, the shapes of faces on ceilings,
mares’ tails in the sky. My eggshell-thin
eyelids take it all in, you might see them flutter,
think I’m faking. But really, if you could get me out
of your looking glass, you could see
the real me; the hermit-crab, the snail inside its opaque shell.
Not a party princess, not ready to embrace
the noisy handsome prince just yet; give me a little
time to myself. I just might dream up a new ending,
a new soul. A sister wise as I am beautiful.
I would give her a sword and riding boots,
talking birds and a sorceress voice. She might even
talk me down from this glass ledge,
this solitude of sleep, might shake me til the apple
drops from my mouth and I finally find my tongue.

 

This selection comes from Jeannine Hall Gailey’s Unexplained Fevers, available from New Binary Press. Purchase your copy here!

Jeannine Hall Gailey is the Poet Laureate of Redmond, Washington, and the author of Becoming the Villainess (Steel Toe Books, 2006) and She Returns to the Floating World (Kitsune Books, 2011) which was an Eric Hoffer Montaigne Medal finalist in 2012. Her work has been featured on NPR’s The Writer’s Almanac, Verse Daily, and in The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror. Her poems have appeared in journals such as The Iowa Review, American Poetry Review and Prairie Schooner. She volunteers as an editorial consultant for Crab Creek Review and currently teaches part-time at the MFA program at National University. Her personal website is www.webbish6.com.

Darren C. Demaree is the author of three poetry collections, As We Refer to Our Bodies (2013, 8th House), Temporary Champions (2014, Main Street Rag), and Not For Art For Prayer (2015, 8th House). He is the recipient of three Pushcart Prize nominations and a Best of the Net nomination. He is also a founding editor of Ovenbird Poetry and AltOhio. He is currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and children.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Lucy Ives’ “Orange Roses”

Lucy-Ives

Beastgardens

First Garden

Beastgarden.

Second Garden

Bees go mad on late summer evenings, should
People stray from their jobs towards water

Beastgarden.

Third Garden

Who makes the rented red boat’s
Oars turn

Who is the younger one always
Turning up

Who professes to be better because
He is just looking

Who says he is worse off as
He cannot look

Beastgarden.

Fourth Garden

The unicycle girl, thin
Like one with a sexual problem,
Goes through
The Schlosspark. This follows:
Father rolling his eyes

Beastgarden.

Fifth Garden

The man from Manchester
Has my breast in his hand

These are funny
They don’t do anything do they

Being burnt by a fire I say

Beastgarden.

Sixth Garden

Similarly, if only
You grasped some
Titanic misery or a
Love like an old man’s

Beastgarden.

 

Seventh Garden

Where were we

A ballroom competition goes on
A yellow satin bikini
A fuchsia floor-length are
Dancing; an audience is
Drinking, clapping 1 2 3 1 2 3

Beastgarden.

This selection comes from Lucy Ives’ book Orange Roses, available from Ahsahta Press. Purchase your copy here!

Lucy Ives was born in New York City in 1980, received an AB, magna cum laude, from Harvard College, an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and is currently completing a PhD in comparative literature at New York University. She has lived outside the U.S. for extended periods in Hirosaki, Japan, and Paris and has studied French, German, Greek, Japanese, and Latin, among other languages. A deputy editor with Triple Canopy, the arts magazine and publisher, Ives continues to live in New York.

Darren C. Demaree is the author of three poetry collections, As We Refer to Our Bodies (2013, 8th House), Temporary Champions (2014, Main Street Rag), and Not For Art For Prayer (2015, 8th House). He is the recipient of three Pushcart Prize nominations and a Best of the Net nomination. He is also a founding editor of Ovenbird Poetry and AltOhio. He is currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and children.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Lucy Ives’ “Orange Roses”

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The Catalogue

1

The body of water a particular time of day resembles         (candida)

Permanence, residence, desire, history, possession        (culture of)

That difference, disproportion
Was written in the stars

                                                                (form of an animal, unnamable
                                                                           ages point to point, how

                                                                                                he rushed to
                                                                                              hunt me with

                                                                                                        a bluff)

Il trompe son monde

2

The man next to me appears

Like an angel enamored of

The apple, to be

In redness, as of love

3

In this black underwear or smiling. Teeth long as a beard
or grinning. That there might be less question of favor

In light of the neck’s miniature hair. On occasion of envy
and admiration. In hopes of return

Respectfully posed for catalogue photos. With apparent concern for
the passerby. Without impatience

That the song continue to their advantage. Palely

4

The way this teacher crowds up over the woman’s shoulder! Ich? She
asks him warmly Ich? The bronze animals twitter, walk on each other’s
shoulders. They were a statue from Bremen, I tell you, a statue!

5

They lay in bed; more honestly, on the floor; most honest, nude on
the carpet under a blanket except for their socks. Behind their heads,
a window, and birds rush up it. A clear day, and this is just after
the flock passes, she asks, “What?” Literally, he has been telling her
about a man he believes practices magic. He is trying to explain what
he will do with his life. “My friend,” he says, “would not even let
me read the book. I tried to pick it up, and he knocked it out of my
hands.” He says, “It’s because he thinks I might be predisposed to do
evil. Nietzsche,” he says, “though, is only talking about bad and good.
There’s a difference between bad and evil.” There is a large silk scarf
stretched across the ceiling. They are on the fifth floor. The authorities
these people report to are different. For example, she says, “You look
like a cat.” For example, he says, “Interesting.” At eleven o’clock they
rise. He moves toward the closet where he removes a small leather
pouch and draws something gold out. “This basically expresses who
my father is,” he says. He has a Mercedes symbol on a chain in his
hand. He does it up around his neck. “I think I am going to wear my
cowboy shirt today,” he says. She goes into the bathroom. Splashing
sounds, faucet and toilet, can be heard. In the meantime, he busies
himself with the cd changer. She comes into the room again in a hurry.
She draws on the long dark coat he admires

6

Our amazing bed is the future. Do nothing but lie down on it. Owners
love the feeling of weightless sleep

7

Our amazing bed is the future. Do nothing but lie down on it. Owners
love the feeling of weightless sleep Miracle on the inside. Our amazing
bed is the future. Do nothing but lie down on it. Owners love the
feeling of weightless sleep. Miracle on the inside. Our amazing bed is
the future. Do nothing but lie down on it. Owners love the feeling of
weightless sleep. Miracle on the inside. Our amazing bed is the future.
Do nothing but lie down on it. Owners love the feeling of weightless
sleep. Miracle on the inside. Our amazing bed is the future. Do nothing
but lie down on it

This selection comes from Lucy Ives’ book Orange Roses, available from Ahsahta Press. Purchase your copy here!

Lucy Ives was born in New York City in 1980, received an AB, magna cum laude, from Harvard College, an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and is currently completing a PhD in comparative literature at New York University. She has lived outside the U.S. for extended periods in Hirosaki, Japan, and Paris and has studied French, German, Greek, Japanese, and Latin, among other languages. A deputy editor with Triple Canopy, the arts magazine and publisher, Ives continues to live in New York.

Darren C. Demaree is the author of three poetry collections, As We Refer to Our Bodies (2013, 8th House), Temporary Champions (2014, Main Street Rag), and Not For Art For Prayer (2015, 8th House). He is the recipient of three Pushcart Prize nominations and a Best of the Net nomination. He is also a founding editor of Ovenbird Poetry and AltOhio. He is currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and children.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Lucy Ives’ “Orange Roses”

Lucy-Ives

Early Novel

riding beside the soul in a great
automobile

fences spiral up whatever’s
at heart

a face that doesn’t look like
a horse

but thinks
with spurs

———————————————————-

in estimation of the moment before impact
the weight in it rides out but not on legs

the wheels farthest in back lock
and swinging over ice are

muscle under weight of bone
or limb that whips along an arc

———————————————————

if one follows one’s understanding rather
than resisting: pleasure.

though, not following pleasure:
receiving its press from out

the world as one

———————————————————

enters farther

——————————————————–

in the economy of appearance
for so many hundreds here

to enter yet
control

just now
your partnership

I love you, giving up
love you, passing in

——————————————————–

don’t we just want to climb
back in our bed

sleep, exchange
imperial, the perfect

rose, nothing
no one’s

——————————————————-

he remains, the
greatness is in him

and in leaving, the left
is great

absence of emotion in a room

letting us wait

why wait

——————————————————–

made

and made the flame at least with these
eyes in mind

memory

made night for remembrance

made the intentions that someone wear
them

made water that
it lie in the sink in an adjoining room

passage for carrying

the knot so language would have
mention

of what it later did

—————————————————–

the conversation of one
thousand dreams

occurred
a tent fell

—————————————————

the idea there
is a world

and each person
under that tent, another myself
or the wiser picture
of foreigners walking in a field

if we approach
one thinking

it is a child
we haven’t

————————————————–

walking backwards I said, Tell me
what man is

This selection comes from Lucy Ives’ book Orange Roses, available from Ahsahta Press. Purchase your copy here!

Lucy Ives was born in New York City in 1980, received an AB, magna cum laude, from Harvard College, an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and is currently completing a PhD in comparative literature at New York University. She has lived outside the U.S. for extended periods in Hirosaki, Japan, and Paris and has studied French, German, Greek, Japanese, and Latin, among other languages. A deputy editor with Triple Canopy, the arts magazine and publisher, Ives continues to live in New York.

Darren C. Demaree is the author of three poetry collections, As We Refer to Our Bodies (2013, 8th House), Temporary Champions (2014, Main Street Rag), and Not For Art For Prayer (2015, 8th House). He is the recipient of three Pushcart Prize nominations and a Best of the Net nomination. He is also a founding editor of Ovenbird Poetry and AltOhio. He is currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and children.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Lucy Ives’ “Orange Roses”

IvesCover-350x466

European

 

Yellow-red

Roses at a blue gate

Boys brush aside sand

 

Orange roses

White,
Red

This selection comes from Lucy Ives’ book Orange Roses, available from Ahsahta Press. Purchase your copy here!

Lucy Ives was born in New York City in 1980, received an AB, magna cum laude, from Harvard College, an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and is currently completing a PhD in comparative literature at New York University. She has lived outside the U.S. for extended periods in Hirosaki, Japan, and Paris and has studied French, German, Greek, Japanese, and Latin, among other languages. A deputy editor with Triple Canopy, the arts magazine and publisher, Ives continues to live in New York.

Darren C. Demaree is the author of three poetry collections, As We Refer to Our Bodies (2013, 8th House), Temporary Champions (2014, Main Street Rag), and Not For Art For Prayer (2015, 8th House). He is the recipient of three Pushcart Prize nominations and a Best of the Net nomination. He is also a founding editor of Ovenbird Poetry and AltOhio. He is currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and children.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Lucy Ives’ “Orange Roses”

Lucy-Ives

Picture

One man’s insanity, smell of
His sweat where he comes
To drink in the shade

The hanging face
Whining, and quiet, every
Few minutes—some hungry
Birds overhead

White heels on his sneakers

 

Like a cat can
See things out of order

 

Most obvious—most difficult
To remember

A young balding man in blue
Airline socks and
Short tie with a photo of
An eagle came into
The church yard holding the
Hands of two women

He said
“Why aren’t we
Singing?

 

the red boxes drawn over
the limestone face of
the boy’s school

the red boxes of tulips

“I thought she wasn’t even
going to be sick that
long,” said a woman
[next to me] into her phone

a short woman in a
blue plastic coat

a pair of shoes with
shells sewn in

 

on sale shirts open like
roses cross the floor

there is a woman
kneeling in a black scarf

sunglasses on tables
cards & kids’ novels

“I hate it when people look
backwards, I’m like
Look up! Look up!

 

A girl with cell phone pressed
To her gray and red face
Cries, “But she already
Went and did it!” Her
Eyes like diamonds, big
And square

The man with white dust on his
Hands in the train flipping
His phone shut and then
Open, and sleeping then

The lean man in a jean
Suit with the words
“PIPE WORKS” printed across
The top

The man next to us

Shaking his head, his
Single diamond earring

“I’ll call you, I still need
To have lunch

2 rubber bracelets
At his wrists
Pale dragon and crosses

A cup of orange drink in his
Left hand; the flag on a string

Clear plastic cone

 

The cup of flame above
The refinery

Red floor of the landfill
By the yard of red and white
Cranes

Violet clouds
White plains

above the cement sides of this
highway are tree tops

the U-HAUL headquarters was once
the town hall

docks and crates break apart

below ads in which two muscular

children hold glass bottles

 

Gray curl of a helicopter

Plastic lamb

Crows

 

“As long as you don’t think
About it like work, what
You’re doing is probably cool

“Fuck it looks like Seattle, like
Vegas, both
Together

Pigeons across

Translucence of a setting lawn

Pretzel broken
Open by someone’s feet

 

“You can’t see so you
Gotta just throw your hands
Up and hold yourself
There

Brown cellophane
Tugged from a
Crushed cassette tape

Red parallel the iron
Track and comes past

Buildings

 

 

 

 

This selection comes from Lucy Ives’ book Orange Roses, available from Ahsahta Press. Purchase your copy here!

Lucy Ives was born in New York City in 1980, received an AB, magna cum laude, from Harvard College, an MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and is currently completing a PhD in comparative literature at New York University. She has lived outside the U.S. for extended periods in Hirosaki, Japan, and Paris and has studied French, German, Greek, Japanese, and Latin, among other languages. A deputy editor with Triple Canopy, the arts magazine and publisher, Ives continues to live in New York.

Darren C. Demaree is the author of three poetry collections, As We Refer to Our Bodies (2013, 8th House), Temporary Champions (2014, Main Street Rag), and Not For Art For Prayer (2015, 8th House). He is the recipient of three Pushcart Prize nominations and a Best of the Net nomination. He is also a founding editor of Ovenbird Poetry and AltOhio. He is currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and children.

Project Bookshelf: Darren C. Demaree

Darren

My bookshelf is tucked into the wall of our living room.

My bookshelf is five shelves tall. The top three shelves are filled with poetry collections. I have a collection of Vladimir Nabokov books in my bedroom, a few non-fiction books and novels in the basement, but these three top shelves are all poetry collections. As you can tell they are almost full, which means I will need to be creative with the next year’s additions. The second shelf from the bottom is all hard copies of literary journals I’ve been included in. Resting on top is the new Colorado Review, for which I just received my contributor’s copies this week. The bottom shelf is for kid’s books only. Included on that shelf is my favorite, Neil Gaiman’s “Crazy Hair”.

The mess surrounding the shelves, sometimes taking over the shelves, includes many toys, a pink baseball glove, Brian Oliu’s two books (which I am re-reading right now), and a revolving lineup of art. Placing a piece of art on the wire that runs the length of the fall to the bookshelf is the highest honor awarded to a member of my family. I only make it on to the line when I have a new book come out, and even then I am only given a day for each new publication. So far I’ve had two days that were full of glory and much preening on my part, and I’m already looking forward to my next book day in 2015 when “Not For Art Nor Prayer” comes out.

Darren C. Demaree is the author of As We Refer to Our Bodies (2013, 8th House), Temporary Champions (2014, Main Street Rag), and Not For Art Nor Prayer (2015, 8th House). He is the Managing Editor of the Best of the Net Anthology. He is currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and children.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Zoe Tuck’s “Terror Matrix”

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is it strange that sisters are so distant
what is spoken of a lover he remembered
your name long after he forgot his
own       escape to state where sweet
jane plays and oily fish slides down
my throat        negating the sensation
of hunger        we do a lot of name play
where they learn me through disrupting
rhythm here       in my house where no
one could be said to dwell i introduce
myself only to my captors when they
change my designation otherwise hail no
one knowing no neighbor who greets me
making me in that instant and after      a
living image thus plucked from bare life
and set in mental constellation        all
my stories have gone viral then been lost
forgotten suppressed discarded erased 18
redacted cut up written over        in your
mind’s sky dear ones dear ones do you
remember one story in which i take part
several variants recorded in asia minor
alone heroes get a story goddesses and
gods what do i get        the fact of being
lost in a fantasy        techniques to keep
me this side of catatonia

This selection comes from Zoe Tuck’s book of poetry Terror Matrix, available from Timeless, Infinite Light! Purchase your copy here!

Zoe Tuck was born in Texas, where she first encountered two of her great loves: poetry and breakfast tacos. Since relocating to the Bay Area in 2008, she has been an active member of the local literary community, working for several years at Small Press Distribution and co-curating Condensery Reading Series. Her book, Terror Matrix (2014) is available from Timeless, Infinite Light. Some of her recent work can be found in Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry, as well as online in issue 18 of textsound and issue 15 of dusie. She is also a poetry reader forHOLD: a journal, a monthly blogger at Michigan Quarterly Review, and an occasional book reviewer at the Volta blog. She is currently at work on a manuscript of tarot poems called Summer Arcana. Find her at zoetuck.com or on twitter @oh_that_zoe.

Darren C. Demaree is the author of three poetry collections, As We Refer to Our Bodies (2013, 8th House), Temporary Champions (2014, Main Street Rag), and Not For Art For Prayer (2015, 8th House). He is the recipient of three Pushcart Prize nominations and a Best of the Net nomination. He is also a founding editor of Ovenbird Poetry and AltOhio. He is currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and children.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Zoe Tuck’s “Terror Matrix”

Terror_Matrix_1024x1024

wherein i admit here that some violence
or other prejudice that burbles up at the
edges of my living      is of another order
than the story i’ve inscribed here on this
character of self      who am i and who
am i to speak and who am i to speak for
whom    emplacement first weaponry then
positioning of more neutral character but
having read from definition 1 to 2 the
meaning stuff of 1 clung and lingered
as i moved through 2       bombardier
just as i moved from male to female or
maybe something other      something of
the initial imposition clung and wafted
around and alongside me       assent to
come into this 3x6x7 room predicated on
the unstated idea of safeguarding my self
and world     subversion of my project by 16
act of retaining isthmus to the worldself
system       not unmade a safeword for a
safe poetic exercise in s&m

This selection comes from Zoe Tuck’s book of poetry Terror Matrix, available from Timeless, Infinite Light! Purchase your copy here!

Zoe Tuck was born in Texas, where she first encountered two of her great loves: poetry and breakfast tacos. Since relocating to the Bay Area in 2008, she has been an active member of the local literary community, working for several years at Small Press Distribution and co-curating Condensery Reading Series. Her book, Terror Matrix (2014) is available from Timeless, Infinite Light. Some of her recent work can be found in Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry, as well as online in issue 18 of textsound and issue 15 of dusie. She is also a poetry reader forHOLD: a journal, a monthly blogger at Michigan Quarterly Review, and an occasional book reviewer at the Volta blog. She is currently at work on a manuscript of tarot poems called Summer Arcana. Find her at zoetuck.com or on twitter @oh_that_zoe.

Darren C. Demaree is the author of three poetry collections, As We Refer to Our Bodies (2013, 8th House), Temporary Champions (2014, Main Street Rag), and Not For Art For Prayer (2015, 8th House). He is the recipient of three Pushcart Prize nominations and a Best of the Net nomination. He is also a founding editor of Ovenbird Poetry and AltOhio. He is currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and children.

The Wardrobe’s Best Dressed: Zoe Tuck’s “Terror Matrix”

zoetuckauthorphoto

where the path we’ve chosen takes a
shape     a common practice enclosed
in systematic speech     where a bogey
crashed or grew up strong     causes you
to shake from fear     the same team
the same air     to sit by the judge and
look through time and space     like a
suitor or a hunter     when’d you land
here      where we were forced first to
gather then disperse      or chose to flex
and zoom around the city a unit since
partitioned     fought what power a plaque
was later bolted in discreetly     to honor
and obstruct a learned behavior      if
i try the knob it doesn’t move      the
lockedness of the door’s affirmed if move
then pull and hope i will make the hall
though the doctor’s henchmen beat me 14
down but if knob turns but door still
sticks      i’ll ululate or gasp in horror
got locked up in an idealism blood and
money story      there were no pennies
on the dusty floor      i put some from my
pocket in the trash so if they checked
there’d be some      this wasn’t my first
lesson in unworlding      the doctor’s
henchmen checked the trash bag for him
the doctor gave me one slice of cake on
the face for each of them

This selection comes from Zoe Tuck’s book of poetry Terror Matrix, available from Timeless, Infinite Light! Purchase your copy here!

Zoe Tuck was born in Texas, where she first encountered two of her great loves: poetry and breakfast tacos. Since relocating to the Bay Area in 2008, she has been an active member of the local literary community, working for several years at Small Press Distribution and co-curating Condensery Reading Series. Her book, Terror Matrix (2014) is available from Timeless, Infinite Light. Some of her recent work can be found in Troubling the Line: Trans and Genderqueer Poetry, as well as online in issue 18 of textsound and issue 15 of dusie. She is also a poetry reader forHOLD: a journal, a monthly blogger at Michigan Quarterly Review, and an occasional book reviewer at the Volta blog. She is currently at work on a manuscript of tarot poems called Summer Arcana. Find her at zoetuck.com or on twitter @oh_that_zoe.

Darren C. Demaree is the author of three poetry collections, As We Refer to Our Bodies (2013, 8th House), Temporary Champions (2014, Main Street Rag), and Not For Art For Prayer (2015, 8th House). He is the recipient of three Pushcart Prize nominations and a Best of the Net nomination. He is also a founding editor of Ovenbird Poetry and AltOhio. He is currently living in Columbus, Ohio with his wife and children.